Skip to content
ITCHING TO KNOW MORE? PSORIASIS INSIGHTS

FLARE UP YOUR KNOWLEDGE

We know, psoriasis can be a real itch! And if you have the most common form, plaque psoriasis, there is no getting away from the fact that it can cause a great deal of discomfort and shows up in the most awkward places on the body such as the scalp, knees and elbows1. But hey, it doesn’t stop there! It’s actually a condition that goes much deeper than the skin surface and is caused by an overactive immune system. That’s right, the body is essentially going to battle with its own immune system and you’re seeing the flares on the skin2.

What you see on the outside1

Red patches
of skin
Thick silvery
scales/flakes
Dry cracked skin
that may bleed

What’s happening on the inside3

Your immune system is overactive, causing skin cells to be produced faster than normal. New skin cells are reaching the skin's surface in 3 to 4 days instead of the usual 28 to 30.

But your body can't shed the new skin cells at that fast of a rate. So while new skin cells are being produced, the old, dead skin cells pile up on top of each other forming the thick, red, itchy, flaky patches.

How it can make you feel

Uncomfortable
Painful
Depressed
Itchy
Embarrassed
Low self-esteem
Isolated

LIVING WITH
THAT EXTRA LAYER

Because life isn’t complicated enough, the reality of living with psoriasis means that you’re faced with a lot of unknowns that are often kept inside. It’s no surprise that this can all add up to create that extra layer of angst and distract from those more exciting things in life that you feel should matter the most!

If I can’t go to work will I be looked over for that promotion?
Will I be able to go to that? If I get a flare I won’t want to wear it, so I just won’t go.
Will the dermatologist have the time for me?
Will the itching ever stop?
Will I pass my psoriasis on to my baby?
Will this treatment impact my loved one?

Well, guess what, you’re not alone in these thoughts! They are very common concerns for people living with the condition. But let’s not forget, here is where the vicious cycle comes into play as stress and worry is a common trigger for a flare.

While it’s not always easy to open up and share your inner thoughts, being honest and even finding a way to joke about your psoriasis can help you face the everyday challenges of this chronic condition. Whether it’s connecting with others and sharing stories, talking to your doctor about what treatment might be right for you, or finding a way to laugh with family and friends.

ADDRESSING PLAQUE PSORIASIS
INSIDE AND OUT

Finding the right treatment is important. There are many different options, from topicals and phototherapy that are applied on the outside of the skin to biologic treatments that work from inside the body.

Remember that you are not alone in the search for a new treatment. Your doctor can help you understand the different types and find the best treatment for you. Learn about a targeted treatment for moderate-to-severe plaque psoriasis.

TACKLING TOUGH SITUATIONS
WITH HUMOR

Living with psoriasis can often mean having to build a “thick” skin and stand up to those that stare. While it’s not always easy, having the confidence to do so can help reduce the discomfort and awkwardness of certain situations, and turn them into teachable moments.

It’s important to share the facts and while psoriasis is no laughing matter, humor can be an effective tool to help break the ice and open up a larger conversation that may help bust the myths and have a lasting impact.

Check out our handy guide to Keepin’ It PsO Real that offers some fun PsO Life Libs games and thought starters on how humor can be used to reduce discomfort and turn awkward psoriasis encounters into teachable moments. Download Here

References: 1) National Psoriasis Foundation. “About Psoriasis” https://www.psoriasis.org/about-psoriasis. Accessed on January 11, 2018. 2) National Psoriasis Foundation. “The Immune System and Psoriatic Disease” https://www.psoriasis.org/research/science-of-psoriasis/immune-system. Accessed on January 11, 2018. 3) National Psoriasis Foundation. “Psoriasis” https://www.psoriasis.org/parents/about-psoriasis Accessed on January 11, 2018.

PROUDLY SUPPORTED BY

SUN DERMATOLOGY